Letter to Editor

Not only toilets

Dear Editor,

While I agree that “access to sanitation and water are fundamental human rights”  the assertion that  “a lack of these services is putting hundreds of millions of children, girls and women at risk each and every day.” where the risks refer not to health and hygiene but rather risk to personal safety and freedom from violence, takes attention away from basic equality and humanity.   Continue reading

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Conference, Quotes

#AIDCONF2014 Notes from Day2

Quotable Quotes

“The government is not implementing the laws.”
“You are saying Bihar is the most backward but let me tell you West Bengal has taken the place of Bihar.”
“For two days in the AID Conference we have a space where we can talk about the struggles we go through personally to stand against caste, sexism, lifestyle expectations.  If I have to ask, where do I get the strength to face these issues and not give into family pressures, it is from AID and discussions like the ones we have in the gender session.”

Continue reading

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Conference, Notes

#AIDconf2014 Notes from Day1

AIDCONF2014# Day1

In spite of our late arrival last night we got up in good time thanks to jet lag.  We were in Ramesh’s “second home,” which meant that even though we had seen on the guest-host spreadsheet that Kamayani and we were both hosted by Ramesh, we did not meet because Ramesh has two houses and she was in one and we in the other.  Also in our house were William Fontenot, an environmental advocate from Louisiana, and Sridhar Vedachalam, formerly of Cincinnati and now of Ithaca.  All of us were up by East Coast morning.  William and I enjoyed a scenic walk to the campus seeing along the way some rushing waters, melted off the nearby mountaintops.

Wow, AID Colorado’s got it made in the shade, you may think.  Especially if you heard Ramesh talking to volunteers at the conference in Charlotte last year, “Come to Boulder, we’ll find you jobs!” Continue reading

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Resources

Adventure Stories set in India

Dalal RanthamboreNational Book Trust, Children’s Book Trust, Tulika Books, Amar Chithra Katha and a number of other publishers offer a decent variety of books for children. Picture books, early chapter books, stories from mythology, contemporary culture, historical fiction and more wonderful books are available for early and elementary readers. However as children demand books of more advanced reading level, the selection dries up considerably. Those fluent in English turn to books published abroad which are imaginative, entertaining and also huge in number. This is fine as far as it goes, but what about books set in Indian landscapes, with Indian characters? Have we no room for adventure? Continue reading

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